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March 28, 2018

National Nutrition Month: How many calories should your child be eating?

March is National Nutrition Month, a time to focus on healthy eating and and proper nutrition. We’ve been sharing helpful tips from the USDA’s MyPlate program. For more on the MyPlate program and to find more healthy recipes, fun activities, and meal planning materials, go to www.choosemyplate.gov. 

Young Children

According to the USDA MyPlate Guide, the healthy number of calories a preschooler needs are:

AGE SEX DAILY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CALORIE LEVEL OF FOOD PLAN
2 yrs Boys and Girls Any level 1000 calories
3 yrs Boys Less than 30 minutes 1200 calories
30-60 minutes, More than 60 minutes 1400 calories
Girls Less than 30 minutes 1000 calories
30-60 minutes 1200 calories
More than 60 minutes 1400 calories
4-5 yrs Boys and Girls Less than 30 minutes 1200 calories
30-60 minutes 1400 calories
Boys More than 60 minutes 1600 calories
Girls More than 60 minutes 1400 calories

Getting Older Children Involved

You may need some patience when first getting your young chef familiar with the kitchen, but the long-term benefits will pay off as it provides a good opportunity to teach about healthy eating and the importance of sharing household duties.

Here’s a few tips from the MyPlate program to help get young chefs involved:

1.) Create a yogurt sundae!

Top plain, low-fat or fat-free yogurt with fresh, frozen, or canned fruit, like bananas, strawberries, or peaches. Sprinkle whole-grain cereal on top for crunch.

2.) Make pita pockets

Stuff a small whole-wheat pita with sliced bell peppers, salsa, and a slice of low-fat cheese. Melt in the microwave for 15-20 seconds.

3.) Jazz up your favorite cereal

Make a trail mix! Stir 1/4 cup of unsalted nuts, 1/4 cup of dried raisins or cranberries, and 1/4 cup of whole-grain cereal together.

4.) Make a fruit sandwich

Cut an apple into thin slices. Spread peanut butter or almond butter between two slices to create “apple sandwiches.”

5.) Dip your veggies

Create veggie treats by dipping slices of cucumbers, peppers, and carrots in a low-fat salad dressing or hummus.

6.) Pack an afterschool snack

For a healthy afterschool snack, keep a fruit cup packed in 100% juice or water in your bag. Some fresh fruit, like bananas and oranges, are also easy to pack and eat any time.

You don’t have to wait for a party to make these “party pinwheels.” The bite sized sandwich roll ups also make great snacks.

7.) Try a piece of cheesy toast!

Toast a slice of whole-wheat bread and top with a slice of your favorite low-fat cheese.

8.) Freeze your fruit

For a frozen treat on hot days, try freezing grapes or bananas! Don’t forget to peel bananas and pull grapes from the stem before freezing.

9.) Power up with ‘roll-ups’

Roll a slice of low-salt deli turkey or ham around an apple wedge or around a slice of low-fat cheese.

10.) Build a fruit salad

Mix your favorite sliced fruits such as pineapple, grapes, and melon.

March 23, 2018

UFCW members get access to special AT&T discounts

How it Works


AT&T is the only nationwide unionized wireless carrier. When you choose AT&T, you support the nearly 150,000 union members employed there.

Shop Online.

Go to the AT&T Union Member site and enroll in the Union Member Discount Program.

Shop online

Go In-Store.

Visit your neighborhood AT&T store and show them your union ID and the discount code: 3508840.

More Information


Local 919 SOH Photo 3


Interested in more discounts for UFCW members? Check out MyUFCW.org.

March 20, 2018

Women’s History Month: 1911 Triangle fire survivor recalls the tragedy in her own words

On March 25, 1911, one of the deadliest disasters in New York’s history unfolded over the span of 15 tragic minutes as fire tore through the Triangle shirtwaist factory. One hundred forty-six people, mostly young women and girls, and many of them recent immigrants, died in the fire, unable to escape through the doors that management regularly locked to prevent workers from leaving.

Prior to the fire, the women who worked at Triangle Waist Company had already tried to organize and improve conditions at the factory.

A massive strike by women’s shirtwaist makers in 1909, known as the Uprising of 20,000, began with a spontaneous walkout at the company. For years, the International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) had been actively trying to organize the New York garment industry and address poor working conditions and low pay. While the union was able to negotiate a contract covering most of those workers after a four-month strike where women were regularly beaten and arrested, Triangle Shirtwaist refused to sign the agreement, leaving workers unprotected.

Dora Maisler was a sample maker on the eighth floor of the Asch Building survivor of the 1911 fire. She was interviewed by Sigmund Arywitz, former California State Commissioner of Labor in April 12, 1957:

“Well, the only thing I can tell when we were on strike, we weren’t allowed to picket so we used to go with tools, in our sleeves. It was a regular Korean War. So they put out – that’s right. They – you know we weren’t allowed to picket at that time.

So they put out plain street walkers, who used to fight us. So then we – we took off – we made the – the cutters helped us picket. So the bosses put out – put out gangsters to fight us and that was the practice.”

Listen to Triangle Factory fire survivor Dora Maisler recount the fire in her own words or read the transcript:

A policeman stands in the street, observing charred rubble and corpses of workers following the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire in New York City on March 25, 1911. Hulton Archive


Remembering the Victims of the Fire

 

March 14, 2018

UFCW’s Work to “Bring Value to Retailers and Customers” Highlighted on DealCrunch

UFCW Featured on DealCrunch.com:

UFCW Fights to Improve the Pay and Quality of Life for the Workers Who Bring Value to Retailers and Customers

By: Chris Curry

The Crunch: The United Food & Commercial Workers International Union works daily to improve pay, benefits, and working conditions for its 1.3 million members. The UFCW is America’s largest private sector labor union and represents the grocery, retail, and packing house workers who help the economy run. As technology threatens to automate many jobs, the UFCW is working to show the value that knowledgeable and professional associates bring to customers and businesses. The organization also helps members advance their careers through free college tuition and GED courses. In the modern labor movement, the UFCW stands up for working conditions — and work-life balance — that result in better jobs and a stronger labor force.

The members of the United Food & Commercial Workers International Union play an often-overlooked role in our daily lives.

Take Super Bowl Sunday for instance. UFCW members work in the industries that provide some of the most popular items on the menus at parties across the country: Nathan’s Famous hot dogs, the Heinz Ketchup for those hot dogs, the Hidden Valley Ranch dressing for the chicken wings, and they even sell the avocados for the guacamole. The Jim Beam for the whiskey and Cokes came from a distillery whose workers are represented by the UFCW, and members made the leather for the footballs used in the game.

“Our members are behind the scenes in all these daily interactions and moments in people’s lives, from the Super Bowl to Christmas,” UFCW Communications Director Erikka Knuti said.


In addition to featuring the hard work UFCW members do and the value they have to offer, DealCrunch also highlighted a number of the education opportunities available to UFCW members and their family members:


Programs Help Prepare Members Through Education & Skills Training

In the modern workplace, businesses and employees both face a significant challenge in managing rapid change. And while companies allocate resources for change in the form of equipment or technology, preparing workers for an evolving workplace is often an afterthought.

The UFCW has introduced multiple programs to help members adapt to changes and progress in their careers and personal lives.

Free College for Career Advancement Opportunities

UFCW members and their families — spouses, domestic partners, children, stepchildren, and grandchildren — receive free tuition toward an online associate’s degree from Eastern Gateway Community College in Ohio. The arrangement covers all fees and ebooks for courses.

The free tuition program initially started with local labor unions in Ohio that recognized cost was the single biggest barrier to finishing college.

Collage of UFCW free college benefits

Finance, marketing, early childhood education, criminal justice, and accounting are among the degree programs available.

Erikka said in one particular case, the opportunity to pursue an early childhood education degree benefited both a UFCW member and the retail store where she works.

“She is taking early childhood development classes and gaining expertise while working in the baby aisle at her store,” Erikka said.

GED Courses to Help Workers Finish High School

Across the country, many frontline retail and grocery store workers drop out of high school to get a job and help support their families. Erikka said a new UFCW initiative is designed to help them.

“We’re about to roll out a program for people who didn’t finish high school to get their GED,” she said.

A GED will help workers meet qualifications for additional positions and open the door to pursuing an associate’s degree through the free tuition program at Eastern Gateway Community College.

Language Training to Improve Customer Service

English as a second language programs are also available to help UFCW workers better serve customers and advance in their careers. The UFCW will soon offer Spanish as a second language programs as well.

The skills that members learn through language courses will only add to their value in a retail setting, Erikka said.

“It all goes back to the value our members can offer a company,” she said. “The fact that they are taking early childhood development classes to better work in the baby products aisle and are interested in taking Spanish as a second language to better help customers, that is something that should be valued.”


 Are you a UFCW member interested in learning more about these discounts and educational opportunities?

Learn More About:

Language Training GED Courses Discounts Free College Degree

March 13, 2018

National Nutrition Month: Healthy Eating Tips for Busy Families

With temperatures warming up and spring just around the corner, March is the perfect time of year to get a fresh start and refocus on eating right and getting healthy.

Balancing work and busy family schedules can already feel overwhelming at times and for many, healthy eating and proper nutrition can be one of the first things that suffers. But eating healthier foods doesn’t have to be a chore. Meal prep and cooking can be a fun way to spend quality time with our loved ones.

What foods are important to your family’s heritage?

Is there a recipe you remember from your grandmother? Food you ate growing up that you have fond memories of? By cooking these foods with your family, you help pass on important traditions. If the foods are fried or high in sugar, can you bake it instead or use substitutions to put a healthier twist on the recipe and make it your own?

Make a plan before you shop.

It’s easy to get distracted at the grocery store or overwhelmed by options. Plan out the meals you’ll be cooking ahead of time and shop with a list. You’ll cut down on food waste and avoid impulse buying unhealthy foods.

Get kids excited about vegetables by growing them.

Even if you don’t have room or time for a garden, try growing some herbs in a pot. Seeing the effort that goes into growing food and having the satisfaction of eating something they grew themselves can really help get kids involved and more interested in their fruits and vegetables.

March 8, 2018

International Women’s Day Began as “International Working Women’s Day”

The month of March marks Women’s History Month, and March 8th is recognized as International Women’s Day, a day with roots in the American labor movement and the struggles of working women.

The article, “Don’t forget what International Women’s Day is really about – striking, that ran in The Independent, recently featured the origins of the day and it’s ties to women workers organizing for better working conditions and fair treatment:

It was in 1857, that on 8 March in New York City, garments workers went on strike. Suffering horrific conditions, endless hours and low pay, they took to the streets demanding better money and working conditions. Dispersed after being attacked by police, the women continued to fight and from their movement the first women’s labour unions were established.

In the early 20th century, their movement blossomed. New York City’s streets again saw women march demanding shorter hours, better pay, an end to child labour and the right to vote in 1908. Leading labour organisers sought to strengthen the movement internationally. At the Conference of Working Women held in Copenhagen in 1910, Clara Zetkin asked over 100 women from 17 countries – representing unions, socialist parties and women’s working clubs – to pass a motion for an International Working Women’s Day. They did so, unanimously, and the so International Women’s Day was born.

To honor the sacrifices made by working women to improve working conditions and secure stability, equality, and independence, we wanted to show a few snapshots of ordinary, working women from our own UFCW history. These moments captured in time speak to the unsung efforts made by women over the past century to ensure Americans could put food on their table, even in times of war. To learn more, read the Women In Labor History Primer. 

 

All photos except the Local 183 photo are from the Wisconsin Historical Society’s collection “Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America records, 1903-1980.”

March 5, 2018

Discounted child care for UFCW members and their loved ones

Raising a family and working is no easy task, and we understand caring for your loved ones is a top priority. To help make things a little easier, the UFCW is excited to announce new discounts on child care services that are available for all UFCW members and their families.

To take advantage of the child care discounts and to see what other savings are available to UFCW members, register for the UFCW discount program.

Register Today


Childcare Network

10% off

10% discount off full-time and part-time permanent placements!


KinderCare Education

Save 10% on Child Care Tuition

The KinderCare Education family of brands connects you with the child care option and location that best meets your family’s needs.

  • Full-time, part-time, before- and after-school care and drop-in child care options
  • Children ages 6 weeks to 12 years
  • 1,500 child care centers and over 400 before- and after-school sites nationwide

 


Au Pair in America

5% off

Special offer for members – Au Pair in America offers a 5% program discount!

Having an Au Pair provides flexibility and dependability! Unlike a babysitter and other caregivers, having an au pair in your home, becomes a full-fledged family member, sharing a unique cultural exchange experience. Au Pair in America offers a 5% program discount for all members, plus no application fee!


Children of America

10% off

10% off tuition on full-time and part-time permanent placements!


Lightbridge Academy

Up to 10% off

Save up to 10% off permanent placements!

Lightbridge Academy offers extended day Infant, Toddler, Preschool and Summer Camp programs. Their unique Circle of Care recognizes the importance of caring for the needs of the entire family – children and parents. Children enjoy “learning through play” and the Seedlings curriculum is developmentally appropriate and focuses on meeting the specific needs of each child. Their child care centers are state-of-the-art with high levels of security, interactive whiteboard technology and the exclusive ParentView® Internet Monitoring System, which ensures that families can stay connected to their children anytime, from anywhere in the world. The Tadpoles parent e-communication app utilizes mobile technology in the classroom to provide real-time visibility and strengthen communication between the center and the families.

Lightbridge Academy Corporate Advantage Program is available at all Lightbridge Academy locations.

Individual Child Discounts:

  • 5% monthly discount for Infant/Toddler Program
  • 10% monthly discount for Preschool and Kindergarten Programs

Multiple Child Discounts:

  • Two Infants: 1st child would receive 5% and 10% for the 2nd child.
  • Two children enrolled in Preschool and/or Kindergarten programs: 10% each child
  • Different age groups: 10% off the oldest child, and 5% off the 2nd child

Cultural Care Au Pair

$575 off

Save $575 on Au Pairs – childcare you trust like family.

They know that balancing work while raising your children is no easy task- that’s why they’re offering families a special discount when you apply for your first au pair!  Find out why 90% of their host families say that having an au pair has given them a greater work-life balance and flexibility. This introductory discount is for families new to their program who host for 30 or more weeks and cannot be applied retroactively.

Register for more information!

February 27, 2018

UFCW cake decorator shows how to make shamrock cupcakes

Just in time for St.Patrick’s Day, UFCW Local 23 member and expert cake decorator Carolyn shows you how to create easy shamrock cupcakes. All you need are some basic decorating tools, icing, and food coloring!

What you’ll need:

  • A pastry bag with #805 tip
  • White buttercream frosting
  • Green buttercream frosting
  • Cupcakes

“With the proper tips, you can make these in no time at all!”
– Carolyn 

February 26, 2018

Black History Month: how the push for fair treatment in a Texas poultry plant changed the health and safety standards of an industry

Union organizing efforts won significant benefits for meatpacking workers during the first half of the 20th century. In 1960, before a wave of automation and rapid restructuring would decimate jobs in the industry, meatpacking wages were 15 percent above the average wage for manufacturing workers in the United States. But one area where change was slow to come was in the poultry industry. Unlike other jobs in meatpacking, a much higher percentage of poultry workers were African American women in the anti-union South.

A reasonable request

In 1953, Clara Holder, an East Texas poultry worker, wrote to Patrick Gorman, Secretary Treasurer of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workman of America (a union that would later merge with the Retail Clerks Union to become the UFCW in 1979). She and her coworkers were fed up with the exploitation and unhealthy practices they witnessed on the job and had decided to form a union to better conditions at the plant.

“I was told to contact your office to secure help in organizing a much needed plant,” Miss Holder wrote. “The majority of the workers are eager to organize, if only they had some advice from a bonafide labor union. Would you kindly inform me if your organization can help us.” Clara Holder’s brief and innocently worded letter sparked a tortuous organizing campaign — in Center, Texas — that stirred racial and class tensions, triggered a national boycott, and persuaded the union to launch a successful drive to reform the entire American poultry industry. – The Texas “Sick Chicken” Strike, 1950s by George N. Green

Strikers outside the Eastex Poultry plant in Center, Texas.

Demands for better conditions spark violence and ignite racial tensions

What started out as a politely worded letter, boiled over into open violence as the strike touched off racial tensions that had been simmering beneath the surface of the small town:

As in most East Texas towns. the white citizens of Center were angered by the desegregation decision of the U.S. Supreme Court (on May I, 1954). Coming on the heels of a strike by blacks, this decision stirred endemic hatreds. Thus, while white strikers seem to have been regarded as curiosities. black picketers were resented. Just after the Eastex strike began, [Meat Cutters’ District Vice-President Sam Twedell] claimed that he was summoned to the county district attorney’s office. There, in the presence of the sheriff, Twedell said he was ordered to “get those goddamn N*****s off the picket line or some of them are gonna get killed.” Twedell refused. On May 20 he sent telegrams to the FBI and the FCC concerning a broadcast on KDET radio, a strongly anti-union station, which “openly advocated violence, as a result of Supreme Court decision … and other racial problems, if Negro pickets were not removed from the picket lines.” Station manager Tom Foster explained that his announcer merely had stated that “Twedell himself was advocating trouble by ordering Negro and white pickets to walk the picket line together. Hancock [the announcer} said that may be common practice in Chicago [location of the union’s international headquarters], but we are not ready for that here.”  Foster, according to one of his friends, was extremely anti-union and simply looking for an angle of attack. Twedell began walking the line with the black picketers.

On May 9 organizer Allen Williams prophetically reported that “We are sitting on a keg of dynamite … I honestly think our lives are in danger … These bastards will stop at nothing, including murder, if they think there is half a chance to get away with it.” On the night of July 23 a time bomb explosion destroyed Williams’ Ford. A fire which resulted as an after-effect of the detonation completely leveled two cabins of the tourist court where Williams was residing and did extensive damage to two other buildings. Fortunately, Williams had stayed out later than usual on the night of the bombing and thus escaped injury. The would-be assassins were never apprehended and, according to his reports in the next few weeks, Williams held some doubts that law enforcement officers seriously sought to find them. Remarking on the openly anti-union sentiments of a majority of the members of a grand jury investigating the bombing, Williams jokingly explained that he felt some fear of being indicted for the crime himself. A second bombing occurred near the black “quarters” in Center on August 12. Though the August bombing scared the black strikers, Williams observed that they weren’t showing it openly.

Neither of the two banks, whose presidents were directors of the Center Development Foundation, extended credit to their fellow townfolk on strike. But the Meat Cutters paid regular benefits through the duration of the conflict and also conducted a highly successful nationwide clothing drive for the strikers. So much clothing was received from the locals that it actually became necessary for President Jimerson to request members to halt the donations.”– The Texas “Sick Chicken” Strike, 1950s by George N. Green

Resulting wins and establishment of poultry inspections

Donald D.Stull and Michael J. Broadway wrote about the struggle to organize and how it led to the inspection of poultry and better health and safety standards for the industry in the book From Slaughterhouse Blues: The Meat and Poultry Industry in North America:

Organizing efforts in the poultry industry lagged behind those in meatpacking: it is a newer industry; its plants were located in the rural South, long known for anti-union sentiment; and it drew heavily on African American women to work its lines. In Jun 1953, poultry workers in the East Texas town of Center asked the Amalgamated Meat Cutters to help them organize. At the time, poultry workers were paid the minimum wage of 75 cents an hour; they worked 10 or 11 hours a day in filthy conditions without overtime pay, and their employers denied them grievance procedures, seniority, and paid holidays. Center’s two poultry plants — one staffed by black workers, the other by whites — voted to join the union. When the companies refused to negotiate in good faith, the Amalgamated Meat Cutters organized a national boycott of plant products, and the workers staged wildcat strikes.

At the time, less than a quarter of the poultry sold in the United States was federally inspected, and neither of the Center plants employed inspectors. With the support of its 500 locals and the endorsement of the AFL-CIO, the Amalgamated Meat Cutters organized a national campaign to mandate federal inspection of poultry. Subsequent

congressional hearings revealed that one-third of known cases of food poisoning could be traced to poultry. Despite opposition from the poultry industry and the U.S.Department of Agriculture, which oversees meat inspection, a poultry inspection bill eventually passed Congress. In August 1957, President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Poultry Products Inspection Act, which requires compulsory inspection of all poultry that crosses state lines of is sold overseas.

And what of the striking workers? Eastex, the plant that employed only black workers, settled after 11 months, agreeing to wage increases, time-and-a-half overtime pay, three paid holidays and vacations, a grievance procedure, and reinstatement of strikers. Eastex subsequently sold out to Holly Farms, which later sold out to Tyson.

 

February 23, 2018

UFCW Charity Foundation Scholarship winners: where are they now?

The UFCW Charity Foundation is currently accepting applications for it’s 2018 scholarship, and we wanted to take the opportunity to report back on where a few of our past year’s winners are and all the exciting things they have going on in their lives. Last August, we spoke with Jennifer Archuleta, scholarship winner from 2010.

“The UFCW scholarship made it possible for me to attend my preferred college even though it was located hundreds of miles away from home.  It also allowed me to spend more time studying and less time working.”

– 2010 Scholarship Winner Jennifer Archuleta

The scholarships are open to both UFCW members and their families. Was it you or a family member that was a UFCW member? 

My dad is a UFCW member who has worked at Albertson’s for over two decades. He recently became a union representative.

Did you find the UFCW scholarship helpful?

Yes.  The UFCW scholarship made it possible for me to attend my preferred college even though it was located hundreds of miles away from home.  It also allowed me to spend more time studying and less time working.

Do you remember how you found out about the scholarship?

My older siblings received the UFCW scholarship.  When it was my turn to apply I looked for information in the UFCW newsletters as well as the website.

What did you end up studying? 

My degree is in Music Education with a concentration in violin.

What do you think was the most valuable thing personally to you about going to school? 

The university provided an intellectually stimulating setting that challenged me on an academic and personal level.  I learned a lot about my major, but I learned more about life, and even more about myself.

What do you do now?

I am a kindergarten through fifth grade music teacher.

What’s your favorite part about your job? 

I love singing and playing with children.  I love nurturing a child’s musical, academic, and emotional growth from their first day of elementary school until their last.

What type of music do you like and what instruments you play?

I am a violinist.  While attending the University of North Texas I had the opportunity to perform in their orchestra, choir, jazz ensembles, and opera pit. 

What’s one fun thing you’ve learned or been able to experience recently?

I recently became certified in the Kodály teaching method, and celebrated by road tripping across the California coast with my sister.  We went hiking, swimming in the ocean, and watched a dog surfing competition.

If you are a past year scholarship winner, let us know what you are up to! We’d love to feature you and your accomplishments.