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Protect Yourself with the COVID Vaccine

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On the Frontlines of the Pandemic.

The UFCW knows how hard our members and other essential workers are working at this time to provide for their communities. To help you stay on top of the latest news on what we are doing related to the pandemic, be sure to sign up for updates below.


COVID-19 Question & Answer Series

The UFCW will be hosting an educational COVID-19 Q&A Series with top doctors and leading public health specialists from across the country to answer your questions about the COVID-19 disease and the life-saving vaccines for it. To RSVP for upcoming events and to submit a question, click the button below.

View the May 10 Q&A Townhall here.



Regístrate para las sesiones de preguntas y respuestas sobre el COVID-19

UFCW organizará una serie educativa de sesiones de preguntas y respuestas sobre el COVID-19 con los mejores médicos y destacados especialistas en salud pública de todo el país para responder tus preguntas sobre la pandemia y las vacunas que podrían salvar vidas.

View the May 6 Q&A Townhall here.



Get the Facts about the COVID-19 Vaccine

There are three vaccines available from Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines use messenger RNA (mRNA) technology. Unlike other vaccines, mRNA technology does not use any live virus particles. You will not be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19. Johnson & Johnson is a viral vector vaccine. A viral vector is a gene code which causes the immune system to begin producing antibodies and activating T-cells to fight off what it thinks is an infection.

Safety and Effectiveness

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require two doses, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires one dose.  All three vaccines are extremely effective.

Vaccines cannot be mixed and matched between doses. The length of vaccine-induced immunity is not known at this time, and booster shots may be required.

Some people who get a COVID-19 vaccine will experience side effects, particularly after a second dose. The side effects of the vaccine appear to be minor and temporary, including injection site pain, fatigue, and occasional fever, headache, or aching muscles and joints. These side effects fade within 1-2 days; no long-term effects have been detected thus far.

While the vaccine provides significant protection, it is not 100% effective. There is a slight chance that vaccinated individuals can still get infected with a mild case of the virus. Those who have taken the vaccine can also still spread the virus to others at home and at work. Therefore, it is critical that everyone continue to wear PPE and follow public health protocols for the foreseeable future.

What Is In The Vaccine

Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines use messenger RNA (mRNA) technology. They do not use any live virus particles, meaning individuals will not be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19. Instead, the messenger RNA — a piece of genetic code — directs cells to make the COVID-19 spike protein themselves, after which point the immune system creates the antibodies that fight COVID-19, providing a significant level of immunity.

Johnson & Johnson is a viral vector vaccine. A viral vector is a gene code which causes the immune system to begin producing antibodies and activating T-cells to fight off what it thinks is an infection.

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May 10 Q&A Series Town Hall


 

May 6 Q&A Series Town Hall


Ask Dr. Fauci Town Hall


WATCH: UFCW COVID Press Call – Vaccine Access for Frontline Workers



Because mRNA is easy to make in the laboratory, manufacturers saved years in development, accelerating the creation of the vaccine.

In clinical trials for both vaccines, over 73,000 people from the U.S. and around the world received injections, including over 25,000 people from the communities most impacted by COVID-19, including Black, Latinx, and older people.

How Vaccines Get Approved

Vaccines must be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before distribution. The FDA bases its decision to approve or not approve a vaccine on data from clinical trials. Independent experts and career scientists determine the vaccine’s safety based on the extent of side effects. If the clinical trial data shows enough evidence of efficacy and safety, the FDA will approve the vaccine.


RSVP to UFCW’s COVID-19 Question and Answer Series




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If you are a member with a COVID-19 concern in your workplace, please report it to us.

Many workers are experiencing similar challenges in workplaces across the country. Help us keep track of the problems you are facing so we can better work with employers to address them.


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