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February 14, 2017

Valentine’s Day Tips from the Pros

A little bubbly goes with everything.

Rob Peters, UFCW Local 1776 member and Wine Specialist, Fine Wine & Good Spirits store 4646 in Ardmore, PA says “When it comes to Valentine’s Day, I always recommend sparkling wine because it is popular, versatile and celebratory, i.e. ‘pop the cork.’ Sparkling wine can be used at any time before, during or after dinner.”


There are many varieties of sparkling wine, but Rob recommends sparkling wines from California, Prosecco from Italy or the classic: champagne from France.

Chocolate is always a winner.

When you give a box of Russell Stover, Ghiradelli chocolate or Hershey’s Hugs and Kisses, know they taste a little sweeter because they are made with love by talented UFCW members. Making chocolates is an art form, one your Valentine is sure to love.

UFCW members who make See’s candies craft each chocolate confection by hand. More care and expertise is needed than you might think. Take a look at what goes into the making of these tasty treats and get a glimpse inside the plant where Lucy and Ethel of the classic TV show “I Love Lucy” found out they couldn’t quite hack it:

 

Say it with Flowers

Feel a bit lost in the floral department? Our members work as florists in grocery stores across the country and are happy to help you put together a bouquet.

And if you are a UFCW member yourself, remember you can save 25% on flowers from Teleflora year round.

Discount Includes:

  • 25% discount on flowers & gifts per order
  • Same-day flower delivery service (If ordered before 2 p.m. Monday-Friday or 12 p.m. Saturday or Sunday in recipient’s time zone)
  • Unconditional 100% satisfaction guarantee on a wide selection of expertly designed flower arrangements, gifts, green and blooming plants and wreaths
  • International service (with three-day delivery guarantee; orders for delivery outside the U.S. and Canada taken by phone only.)

Your 25% discount should be applied automatically. If you encounter any issues accessing your 25% discount, simply type BAAUP25 in the Promotion Code box during checkout.

SEND SOMETHING SPECIAL!
ORDER ONLINE OR CALL 888-667-7779

 

November 17, 2016

“We need someone to fight for our rights and to be there when we need help.”

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On Nov. 10, 15 maintenance workers employed at Colonnade Apartments in Newark, N.J., voted overwhelmingly to join RWDSU/UFCW Local 108.

The hardworking men and women were concerned about low pay, health and safety issues, and the lack of retirement benefits. Workers were also concerned about being paid for all of the hours they worked.

“I am happy we voted the union in to represent us,” said Pedro Parada, a porter at Colonnade Apartments. “We need someone to fight for our rights and to be there when we need help. The company has been doing whatever they want to us.”

“I feel happy that we now have a union,” said Elva Rodriguez, who works as a janitor at Colonnade Apartments. “I am thankful for them being there for us. I know they are going to help and care for us.”

“This was truly a needed victory,” said Abraham Asabor, an organizer with RWDSU/UFCW Local 108. “This small group of workers are expected to be Jack-of-all-trades. They not only keep the building clean, they are required to do building and apartment upkeep, painting, plumbing, AC and heating and apartment clean outs.”

“They are required to be on call and they are not properly compensated,” Asabor added. “To add insult to injury, they are treated with disrespect and paid low wages. This is the second building we have organized in the past month and the problems are similar. We will fight hard to make sure these workers receive better working conditions.”

“Most importantly, these workers weren’t being treated with any respect, and they wanted to change that,” said RWDSU/UFCW Local 108 President Charles N. Hall, Jr.

October 26, 2016

“Better things for me means better things for my family and that better future is why I formed a union at my work.”

ardent-mills-workers-local-1995This month, workers at Ardent Mills, a food company in Chattanooga, Tenn., chose a union voice and a better life with UFCW Local 1995. Ardent Mills workers produce flour for breading for fried foods, cakes and pies eaten in restaurants across the country.

“I have two children and my family is my whole world,” said Mike Middleton, a maintenance tech at Ardent Mills who has been with the company for more than eight years. “Better things for me means better things for them and that better future is why I formed a union at my work.”

Workers at Ardent Mills have suffered through cutbacks and reductions in benefits due to a corporate acquisition three years ago with no way to have a voice in the direction of their company. Now, workers at Ardent Mills will have the opportunity to negotiate an agreement that will help them address issues at work, raise wages and benefits, and get the respect they deserve.

“Workers at Ardent Mills deserve better,” said Rick Major, secretary-treasurer of UFCW Local 1995. “They’ve earned respect and a job that lets them support their families and give back to the community they live in.”6028447024_ea51cb9dbf_z

 

 

August 30, 2016

Workers Can Save Themselves from Wealth Inequality

Report by EPI shows that decline in union membership costs nonunion workers $133 billion annually in lost wages  

Washington, D.C. – Today, the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) International Union, the largest private sector union in the United States, released the following statement regarding a new report from the Economic Policy Institute (EPI), titled “Union Decline Lowers Wages of Nonunion Workers.

“This report confirms that union membership is the one clear path to a better life,” said UFCW International President Marc Perrone. “Now more than ever, those of us in labor must discuss openly the incredible benefits that unions bring to all workers. The UFCW union family is committed to proving that we can bring better jobs and futures to every hard-working community.”

The benefits of a union contract go beyond just wages. A union contract is often the only way women can earn equal pay for equal work, and, in some states, it is the only line of defense for workers facing workplace discrimination.

Key findings from the latest EPI report:

  • One of the main reasons why hard-working Americans are struggling with stagnant wages and inequality is because private sector union membership fell from 34 percent in 1979 to just 10 percent in 2013.
  • If union density in 2013 was as high as it was in 1979, nonunion private sector men would have earned an extra $52 each week.
  • The declining rate of union density is costing nonunion private sector workers $133 billion annually in lost wages, which is greater than the economic hit U.S. workers take when we enter into unfair trade agreements with low-wage nations.

A recent report by Oxfam America titled No Relief: Denial of Bathroom Breaks in the Poultry Industry, documented the union difference when it comes to workplace rights and safety after finding that nonunion workers wore diapers when denied bathroom breaks by irresponsible employers.

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UFCW is the largest private sector union in the United States, representing 1.3 million professionals and their families in grocery stores, meatpacking, food processing, retail shops and other industries. Our members help put food on our nation’s tables and serve customers in all 50 states, Canada and Puerto Rico.

Learn more about the UFCW www.ufcw.org

August 30, 2016

Not a Union Member? It Could Cost You

[aesop_quote type=”block” background=”#2695b9″ text=”#ffffff” align=”left” size=”2″ quote=”A new report from the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) shows that the declining rate of union membership is costing nonunion workers $133 billion annually in lost wages.” parallax=”on” direction=”right”]

A new report from the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) shows that the declining rate of union membership is costing nonunion workers $133 billion annually in lost wages. This massive sum – which is more than the economic hit workers take when we enter into unfair trade agreements with low-wage countries – is a key reason why hardworking Americans are struggling with stagnant wages and inequality.

[aesop_quote type=”pull” background=”#ffffff” text=”#cd9727″ width=”30%” align=”right” size=”2″ quote=”This new report from EPI confirms that union membership is the one clear path to a better life.” cite=”UFCW International President Marc Perrone” parallax=”on” direction=”left”]

EPI found that by establishing pay and benefit standards, unions boost wages for all workers. In fact, if union density in 2013 was as high as it was in 1979, nonunion private sector men would have earned an extra $52 each week. This is the first study providing a broad estimate of the wage decline for nonunion workers as a result of the erosion of unions.

This report should also remind us that the benefits of a union contract goes beyond wages.

Earlier this year Oxfam America published a report titled No Relief: Denial of Bathroom Breaks in the Poultry Industry, which documented the union difference when it comes to workplace rights and safety. This shocking study found that nonunion workers wore diapers when denied bathroom breaks by irresponsible employers.

Also, a union contract is often the only way women can earn equal pay for equal work and, in some states, the only line of defense for all workers facing workplace discrimination. Finally, according to the Center for Economic Policy and Research, black union workers experience higher wages and better access to health insurance and retirement benefits than their non-union peers.

“This new report from EPI confirms that union membership is the one clear path to a better life,” said UFCW International President Marc Perrone. “Now more than ever, we in labor must discuss openly the amazing benefits that come to people who join unions. The UFCW union family is committed to proving that we can bring better jobs and futures to every hard-working community.”

July 19, 2016

New York Child Care Grant Benefits RWDSU/UFCW Members

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(l to r) Local 1102 Rep. Mayra Valladares, Elsa Barrera, and Local 1102 Rep. Jeff Guardado.

The RWDSU/UFCW is part of the New York Union Child Care Coalition, a group of unions that developed and promoted the Child Care Facilitated Enrollment Project to help provide affordable child care for working families in the state. By working with New York State Senators Jeff Klein and Diane Savino, the RWDSU/UFCW was instrumental in helping to establish the program.

And RWDSU/UFCW members are starting to benefit. Elsa Barrera is a Local 1102 member and a mother of three. On top of her dedication to raising her three children, Elsa also works full-time at Flying Foods – an airplane food service supplier – at JFK airport. Barrera has received a grant from the program, and will be able to send two of her children to a camp program for the summer at nearly no cost. This support will help Elsa make ends meet and help her children receive the care and security they deserve.

“Workers like Elsa are truly deserving of this kind of grant,” said RWDSU/UFCW Deputy Political Director Jessica Garcia. “This program will help many others provide for their families while ensuring their children get quality care.”

Other RWDSU/UFCW members at Macy’s and H&M have also seen their child care costs drastically reduced thanks to the program.

June 15, 2016

UFCW Local 21 Member Speaks at the White House United State of Women

Ariana Photo 1Ariana Davis, a UFCW Local 21 member who works at Safeway, spoke at the White House United State of Women Summit in Washington, D.C. She shared the stage with President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, actress Kerry Washington and Oprah to discuss key gender equality issues.

Ariana presented with AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler about the best way to give working women equal pay Ariana with Kerry Washington Photo 2and an equal say – a union. Equal pay, fair schedules, paid leave – the bottom line is that if we stand together and negotiate together, we win together.

Ariana Photo 3In front of a crowd of 5,000 people, Ariana shared her experience with being a part of UFCW Local 21 in Seattle. “Being in a union has allowed me to negotiate for and win higher wages, good benefits and economic stability. But the truth is, the power of a union is about much more than dollars and cents. I’ve stood up for my friends at work who were being disrespected by management. And I helped them get justice on the job. That’s a powerful feeling. I am a force in my community.”

Evidence shows that union membership increases wages for all workers, but women experience especially large Ariana Photo 4advantages. Women are the primary breadwinners in 38% of American households – paying them less for no reason puts millions of families and communities at a disadvantage.

Ariana Photo 5Back in the other Washington, Ariana has been busy collecting thousands of signatures as the citizen petitioner behind Initiative 1433, a statewide ballot measure which will raise the minimum wage to $13.50 and provide workers with up to seven days of paid sick leave.

6.8 million women in America belong to a union. Thanks to Ariana, more people know why. Ariana Photo 6

May 9, 2016

New Report Highlights Uneven Access to Paid Leave and Predictable Schedules

WhoGetsTimeOff-report-cover

Image via Center for American Progress

A new report by the Center for American Progress underscores the uneven access to paid leave and fair schedules in the American workforce and the need for legislation to address these issues.

Titled Who Gets Time Off? Predicting Access to Paid Leave and Workplace Flexibility, the report examines the schism between workers in higher paid jobs, who are more likely to have benefits such as paid leave and workplace flexibility, to lower- and middle-income workers, who are less likely to have access to these benefits. According to the report, nearly 40 million workers, or 39 percent of the workforce, still lack access to even a single paid sick day. In particular, hourly workers, workers with jobs in the service industry, and Latino workers are less likely to have access to paid sick days and other workplace benefits. Conversely, older workers, full-time workers, and workers with higher earnings are more likely to have access to employer provided paid sick days, workplace flexibility and predictable schedules.

More needs to be done to address the huge swath of American workers who are at the mercy of their employers and at risk of losing wages or being fired if they need time off to recover from an illness or care for a family member. While legislation has been introduced to address access to paid leave and workplace flexibility, it is still too slow and uneven to affect the majority of working families. Since 2002, only three states have passed laws to provide workers with access to paid family leave; 23 cities and five states have guaranteed workers the right to earned sick leave; and one city and one state have implemented policies to ensure that workers have access to fair schedules.

A full copy of the report can be found here.

May 6, 2016

MORE WORKERS ORGANIZING IN THE FACE OF WEALTH INEQUALITY

UFCW announces 100 organizing wins in roughly 100 days in 2016.

JBS-Workers-Join-Local-1167-300x219Washington, D.C. –Today, the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW), America’s largest private sector labor union, announced its 100th organizing campaign win of 2016. UFCW’s 100 wins in 100 days reflects the frustration felt by hard-working people across this country. The economic pressure felt by working Americans is higher than ever and more and more of them are looking to unions for relief.

“A national conversation about wealth inequality is occurring in packing houses and on the floors of retail stores all over the country,” said UFCW International President Marc Perrone. “UFCW has 100 examples of how these conversations are moving workers to form a union and take action. Workers are realizing that partnering with an established union can help secure the wages and benefits that put them on a path to a better life.”

Wealth inequality has become a dominant issue in this year’s Presidential primaries. In both parties, large crowds of voters assembled for candidates campaigning on a message of economic populism. Concurrently, UFCW field organizers saw that same enthusiasm cross over into their campaigns. Increased attention to wages and inequality has motivated people to become UFCW members.

  • Workers in 26 out of 50 states have already joined UFCW this year.
  • Over 50 percent of UFCW locals have had successful organizing drives
  • 55 percent of adults under 30 hold a favorable view of unions (Pew).
  • In 10 years, millennials will make up 75 percent of the global work force,

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UFCW is the largest private sector union in the United States, representing 1.3 million professionals and their families in grocery stores, meatpacking, food processing, retail shops and other industries. Our members help put food on our nation’s tables and serve customers in all 50 states, Canada and Puerto Rico.  

Learn more about the UFCW at www.ufcw.org.

 

February 12, 2016

“RIGHT TO WORK” FOR LESS LEGISLATION PASSES IN WEST VIRGINIA

Bill only serves to devastate West Virginia and hard-working families

One of the many Local 400 members who voiced why she opposed Right to Work legislation in West Virginia

One of the many Local 400 members who voiced why she opposed Right to Work legislation in West Virginia

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Marc Perrone, International President of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW), the largest private sector union in the nation, made the following statement about the West Virginia Legislature overriding Governor Tomblin’s veto to pass a “right to work” law.

“The West Virginia State Legislators who supported passing this bill are telling West Virginians one thing – you have the “right to work for less.” Simply put, they should all be ashamed of themselves. Rather than helping the hard-working people of their state find good jobs that pay higher wages and provide better benefits, they have chosen to pursue a radical agenda that will devastate countless West Virginia workers and their families.

“Instead of helping raise wages, State Legislators have passed a bill that guarantees lower wages, fewer benefits and more dangerous workplaces. Make no mistake, this only serves to reward irresponsible companies who will do everything they can to pay their workers less. This is true in every state that has passed “right to work” and will sadly be true in West Virginia as well.

“Every American, regardless of the state they live in or their political beliefs, has earned the right to better wages, better benefits and a better life. This bill flies in the face of those rights. Everyone who voted to pass it will be remembered for turning their backs on working families.”

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Join the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) online at www.ufcw.org.

We are 1.3 million families standing together to build an economy that every hard-working family earns and deserves.

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