Social Justice

Equality and Non-Discrimination

At UFCW, we believe that discrimination on the job, be it for race, country of origin, gender, age, disability, religion or sexual orientation, is unacceptable.

To promote these values, we not only work directly with employers to agree on legally-binding nondiscrimination policies in the contracts we bargain, but we also fight to extend these protections to all workers through national legislation such as the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA ” S811/HR1397), to ensure LGBTQ  Ameri­cans do not have to live in fear of being looked over for a position, fired from a job or denied promotion because of their orientation or gender identity. Recently, President Joe Hansen released a statement in support of President Obama’s support for marriage equality. We’ve also been strong advocates for Equal Pay for Equal Work legislation. Also, the UFCW Women’s Network, the UFCW Minority Coalition, and the UFCW United Latinos promote diversity and inclusion within the labor movement and encourage women and minority leadership.

  • UFCW is a long-time supporter of legislation to eliminate gender-based pay discrimination (“Paycheck Fairness Act” S797/HR1519), and workplace discrimination against members of the LGBTQ community (“ENDA” S811/HR1397).

Right to Organize

When workers stick together as a union, they have bargaining power and a collective voice that they simply do not have when they are not unionized.  Being a member of a union not only gives you a better position to get better wages, benefits and working conditions, you also get job security.  Non-union workers have limited rights and can be fired “at-will”, for no reason.  Just because your boss is having a bad day and decides he/she doesn’t want you around anymore. Non-union workers also find that the rules can change at the whim of the employer.

  • Fought efforts to cut funding for the NLRB and to remove the board’s authority to enforce labor laws.

Immigration Reform

Employers who take advantage of immigrant workers drive down wages and benefits for all of us. It’s clear—our current immigration law is broken. Immigration reform is important to UFCW members, many of whom know from personal experience working with the wide range of cultures and backgrounds in places like our nation’s packing and processing plants that the role of immigration in our communities is very complex and comprehensive reform is going to take more than partisan, political mudslinging.

  • Fought efforts to lower wage standards for H-2B guest workers

Recent News

Black History Month: The Fight for Social and Economic Justice Continues

February 26, 2015

The civil rights movement was one of the most significant events in our country’s history.  From the March on Washington in 1963, where Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his inspirational “I Have a Dream” speech, to the march from Selma to Montgomery in 1965, the movement united people of all backgrounds for a common goal […]

Black History Month: The #MoralMonday Movement and the Legacy of Selma

February 23, 2015

  This year marks the 50th anniversary of the historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. A diverse group of marchers walked to demand that the state of Alabama uphold the 15th Amendment to the Constitution, which granted the right to vote to African Americans. In recent years, after regressive policies reminicent of laws that […]

Black History Month: 50th Anniversary of the Immigration and Nationality Act

February 17, 2015

Fifty years ago at the height of the civil rights movement, our country’s immigration policy was radically changed. The Immigration and Nationality Act, also known as the Hart-Celler Act, abolished the national origins quota system which favored some Europeans and excluded Asians and Africans and established a new immigration system that focused on attracting skilled […]

UFCW Celebrates Black History Month: Bayard Rustin–An Overlooked Champion of Civil and Labor Rights

February 9, 2015

One of the greatest moments of the Civil Rights era was the March on Washington in 1963–one of the largest non-violent protests to ever occur in America. The March on Washington brought thousands of people of all races together, in the name of equal rights for everyone–whether they were black or white, rich or poor, […]

Black History Month: Selma to Montgomery March Captures the Nation’s Attention

February 5, 2015

This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most important milestones of the civil rights movement—the march from Selma to Montgomery—which put a national spotlight on the barriers faced by African American voters in the South and led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act. In 1965, a year after the Civil […]

UFCW Celebrates Black History Month: Addie Wyatt

February 4, 2015

Every year, The UFCW and its members take time to remember people in our union who broke barriers, fought for justice, and paved the way for working class Americans today. As part of our annual celebration of Black History Month, we’re looking back at beloved UFCW member Addie Wyatt’s story. Addie Loraine Cameron, better known […]

UFCW Celebrates Black History Month

February 2, 2015

This week marks the beginning of Black History Month–a time to remember and celebrate the rich history of African Americans and the achievements of the civil rights movement. Black History Month dates back to 1926, when historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans dedicated the second week in February as “Negro History Week” […]