Politics

RSS

UFCW Local 227 Members Get Out The Vote in Kentucky

Local 227 onpointMembers of UFCW Local 227 are knocking on doors, making phone calls, and visiting worksites in an effort to get out the vote in Kentucky.

The Bluegrass State is home to one of the most hotly contested Senate races in the country. Republican Senator Mitch McConnell, who introduced national right to work, is facing a fierce challenge from Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Grimes. Local 227 members Chuck Duckworth, Chawan Morgan, and Abigail Shake—all employees of Kroger—have been working hard to get Grimes across the finish line.

“McConnell has sucked the life out of Kentucky,” said Morgan. “We need a fresh face, some new ideas, and a different direction.”

“Alison Grimes understands our struggles,” Shake agreed. “She’s not Washington—she’s Kentucky.”

McConnell’s support for right to work and the close battle for control of Kentucky House of Representatives has brought the issue of workers’ rights front and center.

“We’re the only southern state that’s not right to work,” Duckworth said. “I think this election is very important to keep it that way.”

“I have job security, health insurance, annual raises, equal pay and so many other benefits,” Shake added. “Right to work would take that away.”

The Local 227 members all talked about the importance of reaching out to their coworkers. “For me to go to a door and see a single mom raising three kids on her own, working a job and doing everything she can to get by, for me to help educate her about how to make life a little easier, that’s what is important,” Shake said.

Or as Morgan put it: “It’s about solidarity—being united and strong.”

Member Spotlight: Jerry Knapp

IMG_7253Recently, long-time UFCW Local 1500 member Jerry Knapp was recognized for his years of active service to his union and fellow union members by Region 1, and was awarded with a member award along with several other members who have made a difference in their workplaces. He was taken aback when he learned he was being recognized, Jerry said, but it was nice to know someone knew he existed. After talking with Jerry, it was clear to us why someone would take notice of Jerry and his time in the UFCW:

Since 1966, Jerry has worked as a union member at Shoprite in Fishkill, New York. Working as a department manager at one time, he is now happily employed as a clerk as he nears retirement. In 1994, Jerry was named the Primary Shop Steward at his store–a role in which he still has today. Jerry says that his job “is a good job because of the union,” and that as UFCW members, he and his coworkers aren’t abused or taken advantage of, and they earn good pay and benefits.

But Jerry knows that these things that make a good union job good are only obtainable when people are active in their unions. Jerry has attended countless area meetings, participated in the negotiating process, and been there to advise fellow members on their rights and responsibilities. Being active and engaged, says Jerry, enables union members to have a say in what happens on the job, to choose your lifestyle, and have your career needs and desires heard, as opposed to working for a non-union company that can make promises and change their minds about policies at the drop of a hat. With a union, he notes, you have the right to go back to the bargaining table.

Not only is Jerry involved in his workplace, but in the wider community and Local as well. Jerry has helped other folks achieve the union difference through his organizing efforts, and he has worked to help elect politicians who will represent and look out for the working people in his area. Jerry’s peers have noted that his work has not only earned him the respect of his coworkers, but of management as well. It’s clear that at the end of this year when Jerry goes into retirement, which will be his 49th year of service in the union, he will be dearly missed at work by all.

His advice for others that want to get more involved in the union is to ask themselves what they think they need or want out of their job or in the workplace, and then go after it. If you don’t take advantage of the power you have as a union member by negotiating or working together, notes Jerry, then you don’t have the right to complain.

“Don’t sit back,” he says. “The union starts with ‘U’!”

UFCW Releases Online Ads in 4 Key Battleground Elections

UFCWnewsWASHINGTON, D.C. —The 1.3 million member United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) today announced an aggressive online advertisement campaign in four key battleground elections.

The ads are running through Election Day in Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, and Wisconsin.

In Iowa, the UFCW launched a video that is a twist on Joni Ernst’s original campaign commercial about castrating hogs. “Don’t let Joni Ernst castrate workers’ rights,” the narrator says. Watch the ad here.

In Kentucky, the UFCW launched a video comparing Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to milk that has spoiled. “Mitch McConnell’s been in D.C. since 1984. He’s out of date and out of touch with Kentucky,” the narrator says. They also released a video which calls Mitch McConnell’s 30 years in Washington “long enough.” Watch the ads here and here.

In Michigan, the UFCW launched a video highlighting Governor Rick Snyder’s extreme record. Listing his tax increase on seniors and massive education cuts as examples, the narrator calls Snyder “One Clueless Nerd.” Watch the ad here.

In Wisconsin, the UFCW launched a video criticizing Governor Scott Walker for his failed promise on jobs. “Despite promising 250,000 new jobs, he put Wisconsin dead last in job creation,” the narrator says. Watch the ad here.

UFCW members—some of the youngest in the country—are inspired by online political outreach featuring ads that are cutting edge, creative, and fun.

The UFCW is also sending direct mail into these four states along with putting a large number of members and staff on the ground. The contrast in Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, and Wisconsin could not be greater. The UFCW is committed to defeating the enemies of working families and electing candidates that will fight for higher wages, better benefits, and the right to organize.

###

The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) represents more than 1.3 million workers, primarily in the retail and meatpacking, food processing and poultry industries. The UFCW protects the rights of workers and strengthens America’s middle class by fighting for health care reform, living wages, retirement security, safe working conditions and the right to unionize so that working men and women and their families can realize the American Dream. For more information about the UFCW’s effort to protect workers’ rights and strengthen America’s middle class, visit www.ufcw.org, or join our online community at www.facebook.com/UFCWinternational and www.twitter.com/ufcw.